Scammers are increasingly employing Gmail as a luring tool in order to obtain user information. These attacks frequently include payloads or embedded URLs in emails, and some attackers may include queries that are more likely to elicit a response.

In just one month of September this year, 35 percent of the 10,500 firms surveyed by Baracuda received bait attack emails, according to the research.

According to Barracuda’s analysis, 91 percent of these emails are sent from newly formed Gmail accounts, owing to the widespread belief that Gmail is more authentic and secure. Google’s email service is likewise highly regarded by email security solutions. The software makes it simple for users to create pseudonymous accounts.

Furthermore, attackers utilize Gmail to launch their baits because the platform has the “read recipient” feature, which informs them that their email has been opened even if it has not been responded to.

Users should discard any emails that appear to be phishing attempts and not open themselves up to potential abuse by reading them.

Threat attackers, according to Bleeping Computer, want to make sure the recipient’s email address is valid, active, vulnerable to unwanted emails, and ineffective at identifying spam. Because many of these emails don’t contain any links or attachments, they aren’t considered malicious and can easily slip past phishing defenses.

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